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Art Break: ‘Chain Reactions’ at The Painting Center; Delacroix at the Met; Celebrating Next Wave Festival at BAM

By A. E. Colas, Contributing Writer, July 16, 2018

As a rule, artists are a generous group of people. Yes, sometimes we meet one that is a jerk or worse, but for the most part, these individuals are engaging in the world around them, learning and exploring all kinds of ideas. This week, Art Break focuses on stellar examples of artists who teach, mentor, and share their inspiration with others. Gallery visitors can see how the give and take of the creative process enriches lives with The Painting Center’s summer show; curated by artists, The Met’s exhibit of Delacroix, Burning in Water’s presentation of Oliver Lee Jackson, Cavin-Morris’ group show of Japanese artists, and BAM’s celebration of its Next Wave Festival. All these shows will inspire you to make connections with people, materials, and ideas, giving new energy to daily routine.

Work by Meredith Fife Day; courtesy of the artist / The Painting Center.

The Painting Center: Chain Reactions: Artists Select Artists (July 19 – August 9) asked members of the Center to choose a single artist’s work from their immediate creative community. The resulting group show is a tapestry of community, imagination, and styles. It’s a perfect introduction to the ethos and mission of this non-profit gallery.

Work by Steven Cabral; courtesy of artist / The Painting Center.

The Painting Center
547 West 27th Street, Suite 500
Hours: Tues – Sat: 11-6
Admission: Free

 

Eugène Delacroix: The Giaour on Horseback, 1824–26; pen and iron gall ink with wash over graphite. 7 15/16 x 12 in. (20.1 x 30.5 cm); The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Jane Roberts, 2015.

The Met: Devotion to Drawing: The Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix (July 17 – November 12) demonstrates that drawing is not always a delicate art form. In the right hands, it can crackle with energy, straining to break from the confines of the page. Visit now to learn about Delacroix’s techniques before the September 17 opening of The Met’s blockbuster show of the artist.

Eugène Delacroix: Göetz von Berlichingen Being Dressed in Armor by His Page George, 1826–27; watercolor and bodycolor with gum arabic. 8 3/8 x 5 5/8 in. (21.3 x 14.3 cm); The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift from the Karen B. Cohen Collection of Eugène Delacroix, in honor of Thomas P. Campbell, 2014.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue
Hours: Sun – Thurs: 10-5:30, Fri – Sat: 10-9
Admission:

Out of state visitors: Adults: $25, Seniors: $17, Students not from NY, NJ, or CT: $12, Children under 12 years: Free, Members: Free. These admission tickets are good for three consecutive days and permit entry to The Met Breuer, The Met, and The Met Cloisters.

NYS residents (must show proof, see website for details): Pay what you wish, Students from NY, NJ, CT (must show current student id): Pay what you wish. These admission tickets are good for same day only and permit entry to The Met Breuer, The Met, and The Met Cloisters.

 

Caught our eye:

 

Oliver Lee Jackson: No. 4, 2015; applied fabric, mixed media on canvas.78 1/4 × 66 in198.8 × 167.6 cm; courtesy of the artist / Burning in Water – New York.

Burning in Water: Oliver Lee Jackson: Untitled Original (May 31 – September 1) gives New Yorkers a sample of works before his big show in March 2019 at the National Gallery in Washington DC. The artist makes compositions that are less about his own thoughts and more of a collaboration between himself and the viewer. There is no right or wrong in the audience’s interpretation, if there is an emotional connection between a person and the artwork.

Installation view of Oliver Lee Jackson: Original Untitled exhibit; courtesy of the artist / Burning in Water – New York.

Burning in Water – New York
317 Tenth Avenue (near 28th Street)
Hours: Tue – Sat: 11-7
Admission: Free

 

Ritsuko Jinnouchi: Replacement 1, 2015; plaited walnut bark, 11.81 x 10.24 x 10.24 inches 30 x 26 x 26 cm; courtesy of artist / Cavin-Morris Gallery.

Cavin-Morris Gallery: The Nature of Things: Contemporary Japanese Woven Sculpture (June 12 – August 3) is an eye opener of a show. Using materials from silk to string to steel, these objects are like nothing you’ve ever seen before. And when you factor in the amount of imagination and perseverance it took to bring these sculptures into being, the end results are even more impressive.

Mieko Kawase: Red 3, 2017; wire, 4 x 7 x 7 inches; 10.2 x 17.8 x 17.8 cm; courtesy of artist / Cavin-Morris Gallery.

Cavin-Morris Gallery
210 Eleventh Avenue, Suite 201 (between 24th and 25th Streets)
Hours: Tue – Fri: 10-6 (summer hours)
Admission: Free

 

Poster for the production The Gospel at Colonus during BAM Next Wave Festival, 1983; courtesy of Brooklyn Academy of Music.

BAM: 1983: The First Next Wave (June 8 – August 11) Images from the first season of the Next Wave Festival and a lovely trip down memory lane for anyone who was a supporter back then. With photographs, video, and theatrical ephemera, visitors will get a sense of just how groundbreaking this festival was for NYC.

Production still from George Coates’ The Way of How, 1983; photo: Debra Heimerdinger / courtesy of Brooklyn Academy of Music.

Peter Jay Sharp Building
30 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn (travel directions here)
Hours: Sun – Sat: 10-6
Admission: Free

Contact sheet of Lucinda Childs from 1983; photo:Tom Caravaglia; courtesy of Brooklyn Academy of Music.

 

Cover: Work by Karen Nielsen-Fried; courtesy of the artist / The Painting Center.


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