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MAD: Highlights from the Goblet Collection

Museum of Arts and Design

https://madmuseum.org/

2 Columbus Circle, New York, NY 10019

Marvin Lipofsky Irv Tepper Memorial Hot Dog Cup (from the Great American Food Series), 1973 Glass 6 x 8 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. (15.2 x 21 x 8.9 cm) Museum of Arts and Design; gift of Theodora (Theo) and Sy Portnoy, 1998 Photo by Ed Watkins; courtesy the Museum of Arts and Design

During the 1950s, leading up to the American studio glass movement, artists began working with glass as a sculptural medium through warm techniques like casting or slumping. Glassblowing skills were used in factory settings in the United States; however, artists who wanted to use such techniques in their studios had to start from scratch when learning to use the material. In 1962, Harvey Littleton organized experimental glass workshops at the Toledo Museum of Art, which led to an exploration of glass as a medium for the individual artist. These workshops spurred technical investigation by American artists, craftspeople, and scientists. However, much of the expertise gained by American artists through the 1960s and 1970s was the result of artistic exchanges with Venetian glass maestros, such as Lino Tagliapietra and Pino Signoretto.

Such relationships led to residencies in Venetian factories, which meant an unprecedented availability of information from the previously close-walled world of Venetian glassmaking. It was through these experiences that the goblet—an important form in Venice—became a useful teaching tool. As a result, the goblet-making tradition was brought to the United States, and used in education as a form through which a myriad of complex techniques, such as the use of canes—long, thin rods of glass—to create various patterns and illustrative treatments, could be perfected. —Museum of Arts and Design  

 

Dale Chihuly Untitled, 1968 Glass 12 x 5 x 5 in. (30.5 x 12.7 x 12.7 cm) 11 1/2 x 5 1/4 x 5 in. (29.2 x 13.3 x 12.7 cm) Museum of Arts and Design; gift of the artist, through the American Craft Council, 1968 Photo by George Erml; courtesy the Museum of Arts and Design MAD

Dale Chihuly, Untitled, 1968, Glass 12 x 5 x 5 in. (30.5 x 12.7 x 12.7 cm) 11 1/2 x 5 1/4 x 5 in. 29.2 x 13.3 x 12.7 cm) Museum of Arts and Design; gift of the artist, through the American Craft Council, 1968; Photo by George Erml; courtesy the Museum of Arts and Design

 

Dan Dailey Spike, 1981 Glass, plate glass, vitriolite, screws 14 3/4 x 5 1/4 x 6 in. (37.5 x 13.3 x 15.2 cm) Museum of Arts and Design; purchased by the American Craft Council, 1984 Photo by George Erml; courtesy the Museum of Arts and Design MAD

Dan Dailey, Spike, 1981, Glass, plate glass, vitriolite, screws 14 3/4 x 5 1/4 x 6 in. (37.5 x 13.3 x 15.2 cm) Museum of Arts and Design; purchased by the American Craft Council, 1984; Photo by George Erml; courtesy the Museum of Arts and Design

 

William Gudenrath Venetian-style Dragon Goblet, 1992 Glass Each: 10 3/4 x 3 7/8 x 3 7/8 in. (27.3 x 9.8 x 9.8 cm) Museum of Arts and Design; gift of the artist, 1992 Photo by Ed Watkins; courtesy the Museum of Arts and Design MAD

William Gudenrath, Venetian-style Dragon Goblet, 1992 Glass; Each: 10 3/4 x 3 7/8 x 3 7/8 in. (27.3 x 9.8 x 9.8 cm) Museum of Arts and Design; gift of the artist, 1992; Photo by Ed Watkins; courtesy the Museum of Arts and Design

 

Shane Fero Floral Cup, 2007 Glass 9 1/8 x 2 3/4 x 2 3/4 in. (23.2 x 7 x 7 cm) Museum of Arts and Design; gift of the artist, 2007 Photo by Ed Watkins; courtesy the Museum of Arts and Design MAD

Shane Fero, Floral Cup, 2007, Glass 9 1/8 x 2 3/4 x 2 3/4 in. (23.2 x 7 x 7 cm) Museum of Arts and Design; gift of the artist, 2007; Photo by Ed Watkins; courtesy the Museum of Arts and Design

 

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More information about the exhibition here.

 

Cover photo: Marvin Lipofsky, Irv Tepper Memorial Hot Dog Cup (from the Great American Food Series), 1973, Glass 6 x 8 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. (15.2 x 21 x 8.9 cm) Museum of Arts and Design; gift of Theodora (Theo) and Sy Portnoy, 1998; Photo by Ed Watkins; courtesy the Museum of Arts and Design.


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